Resource Library

Who’s In My Circle? Coaching Tool

Identifying support is not a new idea in the field of coaching. In fact, support is core to working from a strengths-based approach. Mapping who is in a participant’s family honors that family change and be created or chosen. Knowing who is in the participant’s network can also be a critical resource to both participant and coach.

In this same way, coaches and other practitioners need support and an easy reference of who they can and should rely on for professional support. The Who Is In My Circle? tool helps coaches map out the people who can help them face different challenges. Completing it proactively makes it an easily accessible and visual resource.

WAP Income Generation and Leveraging – A State Perspective

This guide highlights resources and strategies for States to use when developing and supporting partnerships that provide additional resources to complement the U.S. Department of Energyʹs (DOE) weatherization program funds.

Training & Orientation Tools for Public & Private CAA Tripartite Boards

These presentations and tools were created by CAPLAW through a collaboration with the Organizational Standards Center of Excellence in response to a need in the network for training and orientation materials.

Framing Two-Generation Approaches to Supporting Families

To build a larger constituency for innovative and robust approaches to social policy and social services, 2Gen advocates need to communicate clearly and carefully. This framing “playbook,” from the FrameWorks Institute and Ascend at Aspen Institute is intended for “the choir:” agency leaders, social service professionals, advocates, and families leading their communities and constituencies toward two-generation approaches for supporting families. This resource provides guidance on making intentional choices about where to start, what to emphasize, and what to leave unsaid.

Framing Two-Generation Approaches to Supporting Families: Messaging Guide

This guide from Ascend at the Aspen Institute provides topline messages, suggestions for using language to make work more compelling, and ideas for bringing 2Gen work to life. Messages are based on results of research and analysis by the FrameWorks Institute. Communicators and front-line staff at your organizations can use them as a filter to craft messages suited for relevant audiences, channels, and topics.

Leading by Exemplar: Instructional Models in Head Start Programs

Leading by Exemplar: Instructional Models in Head Start Programs provides in-depth information about the instructional models of five high-performing Head Start programs from across the country. The programs highlighted in this analysis — referred to throughout as Head Start exemplars — were selected because demonstrate evidence of significant positive impacts on children’s learning.

Leading by Exemplar: Data Utilization in Head Start Programs

Leading by Exemplar: Data Utilization in Head Start Programs provides in-depth information about the data utilization practices of five high-performing Head Start programs from across the country. The programs highlighted in this analysis — referred to throughout as Head Start exemplars — were selected because they demonstrate significant positive impacts on children’s learning.

Leading by Exemplar: Lessons from Head Start Programs

Leading by Exemplar: Lessons from Head Start Programs is a synthesis of findings drawn from an in-depth analysis of five high-performing Head Start programs from across the country. The programs highlighted in this analysis — referred to throughout as Head Start exemplars — were selected because they demonstrate significant positive impacts on children’s learning.

Leading by Exemplar: Case Studies of Head Start Programs

Leading by Exemplar: Case Studies of Head Start Programs is an in-depth analysis of five high-performing Head Start programs from across the country. The programs highlighted in this analysis — referred to throughout as Head Start exemplars — were selected because they demonstrate significant positive impacts on children’s learning.

Accelerating Postsecondary Success for Parents: Identifying and Addressing Mental Health Needs

With 22 percent of the undergraduate student population comprised of parents, policymakers and institutions must explore the unique needs of this population and address the challenges that may prevent parents from attaining their degree. This includes determining what systems, services, and approaches best support their mental health needs. This brief examines opportunities for policymakers and academic institutions to adapt existing mental health services in order to meet the unique needs of students who are parents and help them complete their degree. (April 2019)

Aligning Affordable Housing Efforts with Actions to End Homelessness

In many communities, conversations on housing affordability and those about homelessness are happening in different places among different groups of people. The following strategies and resources will support communities in aligning those conversations and will improve progress on preventing and ending homelessness.

Well After Service: Veteran Reintegration and American Communities

Most veterans successfully transition out of uniform and into civilian life. However, some recent veterans face service-related challenges, and there is no government agency, program or mechanism that properly and holistically addresses their wellness. Instead, communities across America, many of which are unfamiliar with the military and service-related needs, are left to support those recent veterans that need assistance reintegrating into civilian life.

Why Should Nurses Know About Social Determinants of Health?

Nurses have the ability to address social determinants of health in patients and refer those with health barriers to resources. Doing so can have a long-term impact on patient health.

Dotte Agency: A Participatory Design Model for Community Health

As community activists resist racial injustice, food insecurity, and infrastructural delinquency, many groups are attempting to articulate the voice of the citizen. It is within this landscape that architects have historically struggled to find common ground to afford democratic access for citizens to engage in discussions about the future of their city. Based upon surrogate models of other professions, there has emerged a proactive movement towards Social Impact Design. Like many urban core areas, our community faces a health epidemic compounded by poverty. In response to requests for collaboration, and through cross-disciplinary academic partnerships in both public health and social welfare, we have begun to leverage design advocacy to improve health outcomes. This has evolved into an alternative model of practice that advances public design through interdisciplinary, adaptive and incremental spatial agency. It is a sustainable practice that fosters conversations and supports events originating from within the community. Our approach seeks to scaffold an infrastructure of public health through methods of participatory design and advocacy. Through new forms of design intelligence and collaborative design tools, our critical spatial practice demonstrates new ways for how architectural design can be relevant to society.

 

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Our resource team can provide support with accessing resources from our new resource library.

For assistance with Management & Operations resources, please contact: Courtney Kohler

For assistance with Innovative Practices resources,    please contact: Hyacinth McKinley

For assistance with Census 2020 resources, please contact: Lindsay Marsh

For assistance with Energy Partnerships & Programs resources, please contact: Kathryn Maddux